• Äntligen fredag…

    The Dutch router, Marcel Van Triest will be occupying this post on dry land for IDEC SPORT. He was already alongside the team that holds the current record… Staring at the screens at his home in the Balearics, the seventh man prefers to work on drawing up the weather patterns. He will of course have a major role to play advising Francis Joyon.

    Marcel, what is the real problem for a router in the Jules Verne Trophy?

    “We need to look for fast conditions, but which aren’t boat-breaking. Understanding that we can only see ten days ahead at best, there are two goals: the time it takes to get to the Equator and the time to Good Hope. In the South, you take what you are given and there’s no way out: further south, you have the ice, further north the areas of high pressure. Boats like IDEC SPORT sail very quickly, but can’t jump across weather systems in the Indian and the Pacific. After that, the climb back up the Atlantic is down to chance and you have to get lucky.”

    Francis Joyon is sailing with a short-handed crew of just six men aboard in all. Does that change anything in comparison to the bigger crew that Franck Cammas had on this boat or in comparison to the thirteen sailors with Loîck Peyron?

    “Yes. When you are establishing a route for a solo sailor, it’s not the same as for a crew… here, we’re in between the two. That will be one thing I’ll need to focus on. You can’t send a small crew into nasty conditions, as you need to ensure they remain on form and they are going to be very busy. They are going to have to get the timing right to carry out manoeuvres.”

    One of the major questions is how to handle high speeds over a long period. How does it feel on board? You’ve seen what it’s like.

    “Speed in itself isn’t a problem. Sometimes it feels like you’re hardly moving, when you’re doing thirty knots. Wht is very stressful is when you are in boat-breaking conditions. When you wait for the boat to slam down – it gets on your nerves… but being becalmed is too, when you sit there imagining your rival zooming along at thirty knots, while you remain frozen to the spot. You get used to the speed in the same way as when driving at 140 km/h (90 mph) on the motorway. You can even get used to 180 km/h (110 mph)… but you can’t do that in a built up area or when the route is blocked! It’s the same on a multihull. You can sleep at ease at 35 knots on flat calm seas and enjoy yourself… but it is stressful at 17 knots when the sea is nasty. The strong gusts can become a nightmare, when it’s your turn at the helm.”

    How will you be working with Francis?

    “We’re going to have to adapt our way of working, as this is our first time together. Personally, I’m not keen on the phone. With all the noise aboard the boat, there is the risk of not getting all the info and you can’t record it and listen to it again. So I tend to work with drawings with notes on. We work on the basis of twice a day, or more when needed. We exchange e-mails. In the Doldrums, it’s all the time and sometimes, there’s nothing to say. In the last Jules Verne, I only called up the boat twice in 45 days.”

    How much time can be shaved off the 45 and a half day record? Do you think they can reach the 40-day barrier?

    “They could reach it. It’s possible, I mean. If they are really lucky with a weather opportunity that is more or less perfect, allowing them to get a good time to Good Hope, if there’s not too much ice, no technical problems and the Pacific allows you to sail further south shortening the journey… but then again, you can always lose it all again off the Falklands. You need to be lucky throughout in fact, but there is a margin in the Jules Verne. I should add once again that you don’t have to take five days off the record. One hour is enough. The chances are higher of smashing this one rather than the Atlantic record, where you can stay on stand-by for ten years in New York without finding an opportunity to shave 3 or 4 hours off the record. You might just as well ask me if it’s possible to win the Lottery… But, yes for the Jules Verne, it’s feasible, but 40 days would be very tough…”

    We imagine the router sleeping beside his computer and satellite phone, going through the race 24 hours a day. Is it really like that?

    “Definitely, yes! There’s as much stress as on board, except that I can take a shower when I want and eat better stuff. But it has to be very stable for me to get more than three hours sleep in one go. I wake up at least once a day to check things. So the rhythm is very much like aboard the boat. Having said that, it’s a little less extreme in the Jules Verne than during solo attempts, when you are responsible for the life of the only sailor aboard the boat.”

    What do you like about working as a router?

    “There’s just you, land and a blank sheet… It’s a gigantic game of chess. It’s fascinating to work through all the possibilities and when you get a good result from your ideas, it’s very satisfying. You start off with general ideas. You work on them and gradually build up your route… Often in this type of attempt, there are two or three key moments. If you identify them on time and deal with them, you can do it. One of the two calls I made to Loïck during the last Trophy concerned the route down under Australia. By changing ever so slightly the sea state parameters, I could see there was a way through in the south. Loïck thought I had gone crazy, telling me there was already a 10m swell. But if they had followed the initial northern route, the boat would have been held up close-hauled. I said to him, ‘Think back to when we were twenty and looked for a heavy swell. It’s impressive, but it’s not dangerous. You will find it tough for twelve hours, but you will make a huge gain’. That is exactly what happened. I love analysing the weather on that scale. And as I have raced around the world five times, I can well imagine what it is like. It’s a bit like being aboard.”

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  • Ägarmöte 23/11

    Precis som vanligt tänkte jag försöka samla ägarna av de lite större båtarna (typ de som seglar West Side Cup med SRS > 1.22, även om alla är välkomna) för att diskutera säsongen som gått och hur vi vill kappsegla nästa år. På agendan finns också:

    – Uppdatering Marstrand Big Boat Race 28-29/5 2016
    – Uppdatering ORCi Worlds Copenhagen 15-23/7 2016
    – Uppdatering Göteborg Open Sea Race 12/8 2016
    – Rapport från Fastnet Race
    – Prisutdelning West Side Cup (resultaten)

    Jag vill också be om ursäkt då vi inte heller i år har fått till en seglarbal för att avsluta säsongen. Jag har helt enkelt inte fått tiden att räcka till.

    – Tid för ägarmöte: måndag 23/11 18:00
    – Plats: Sjöräddningssalen, Talattagatan 24, Långedrag
    – Anmälan: här.

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  • Alex Thomson – Hugo Boss Near Sinking

    En bra intervju med Alex Thomson, där han går igenom hur Hugo Boss delaminerade, kappsejsade och hur de blev räddade av helikopter. Ett bra (eller dåligt) exempel på hur ett litet problem ganska snabbt kan bli ett stort…

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  • J/11S | Yachting World

    Shorthanded racing for amateur sailors is on the rise. Matthew Sheahan sails one of J Boats’ latest launches that has been aimed directly at the solo and shorthanded scene and discovers a boat that is very easy to get on with.

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  • J/112e Splashed

    Nya J/112e, som är “cruisingpaketeringen” av J/111 (lite bredare, lite mer inredning, lite mer motor, …) ser väl helt ok ut?

    LOA 11.00
    LWL 9.68
    Beam 3.58
    Standard Draft 2.10
    Displacement 5,125
    Engine 30 hp
    100% SA 65
    SA/Dspl 22
    Dspl/L 157

    Within 24 hours of arriving in Bristol, the J/112E was launched Friday at Stanley’s Boatyard and shortly thereafter enjoyed a first sail with the J/Team and the happy new owner. Sea-trials and demo-sails are underway! We can say that after just minutes of sailing, this one is special. The 112E tracks beautifully, handles like a charm, and is just so comfortable above and belowdecks while sailing, you’d swear you were on a much bigger boat.

    As one of the prospective owners said yesterday, “I can’t believe how effortlessly this boat goes through the water compared to my 40 footer. I can see everything from the helm and trim the sails myself. It does all the big stuff really well, and I really like all the small details you’ve incorporated into the deck layout and the interior.”






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  • What’s Up 1244

    Transat Jaques Vabre tuffar på. Nu lite lugnare efter första veckans “boatbreaking conditions”. Även andra etappen på Mini Transat är igång.

    Men annars är det lugnt?


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  • Slut för i år…

    Idag åkte masten av, så nu är det väl officiellt slutseglat med J/111:an för i år.

    Det märks att båten har gått 3.500 distans i år, tidvis i ganska tuffa förhållanden, så den kommer att få lite extra kärlek i vinter. Listan på saker som skall göras är ju alltid lång… Jag skall se om jag vågar sammanfatta den här i vinter.

    Vi passade också på att ta lite riggmått. Nu vet vi till exempel att vi sticker exakt 17.80 över vattenytan. Då är det ju massor av marginal för att gå under lågbron över Stora Bält som är 18 meter…

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